‘The Fourth Turning’

A generation is a group of people that are born and live around the same time. Each generation shapes itself by the people who choose their beliefs, behaviors, and basic attitudes. Being born around the same time, and growing up with similar childhoods, a generation begins to develop similar personas.

According to https://www.fourthturning.com/, generations are identified with specific archetypes that defines similar patterns in individuals. Over the course of centuries, there has been a recurring pattern of the four archetypes. There are four different archetypes: the hero, the artist, the prophet and the nomad. The hero are born after a spiritual awakening, where on the other hand, the nomad is born during a spiritual awakening. The artist archetype is born during a great war or historical crisis, while the prophet is born after a great war or crisis. For further information on each archetype visit www.lifecourse.com.

It was hypothesized by Talcott Parsons that society moves on when an availability and demand for social order rises or falls. This created a theory of having different phases in an era that counts up to four. These phases note the mood of the era and how a generation came of age. Each phase is named after an ordinal number with the word turing as its following.

According to www.lifecourse.com, each turning has its own description and a main generation archetype. The First Turning is time when individualism is weak, institutions are strong, and when the society is confident where they want to go. The most recent example of this turning would be post World War II. The main archetype of this turning was the artist archetype, and the group is also known as the Silent Generation, if born from 1925-1942.

The Second Turning is when institutions begin to be attacked due to the new personal and spiritual autonomy. People become tired from the high of social discipline and begin to seek personal authenticity. The most recent example would be the Consciousness Revolution during 1964-1984. The prophet is the main archetype for this turning because of their passionate idealism.

The Third Turning is the opposite of what the First Turning is: having weak and distrusted institutions and strong individualism. In this turning, society learns that they must change to enjoy life. The most recent event of the Third turning is the Long Boom and Culture Wars. The nomad is the main archetype of this turning, and they were also known as Generation X.

The Fourth Turning has been known for becoming new founding moments by redefining the national identity. The most recent event in America that can be defined as being apart of the Fourth Turning is the Great Recession of the 2000s. The main archetype of this turning is the hero archetype, and is also known in present time as the Millennial Generation.

If you are interested in further knowledge about this topic, you can read the book The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy – What the Cycles of History Tell Us About America’s Next Rendezvous with Destiny, by William Strauss and Neil Howe.                

Teen Summer Spark

By: Vivian S

Do any of you remember participating in the Summer Spark program at the library before? Reading some books and then going to library and getting a prize? Well, this year there is another Teen Summer Spark with a new list of books to read.

There is With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo, which is about a teen mother who is trying to balance completing high school and her dream of being a chef.

Then there is The Weight of Our Sky by Hanna Alkaf. The story takes place during the 1969 race riots in Malaysia, which I have only quickly researched. It seems to be that the Malay and Chinese populations there have always had tensions, but after an election, which afterwards, many Malays marched in Kuala Lumpur (a predominantly Chinese city and where our story takes place), and that march devolved into violence. During this, a sixteen-year old teenager is trying to find her mother, but must first get through prejudice, violence, and her own OCD.

Another is Lovely War by Julie Berry. This story is told by the Greek goddess Aphrodite, and it’s about 4 people who fall in love during the First World War, and the challenges they face.

There is Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett Krosoczka. This book is a graphic novel, and it is all about the author’s life. It is about his mom, who is an addict, his grandparents, who he lives with, and his father, who he does not know.

Also, there is On the Come Up by Angie Thomas. A follow-up to The Hate U Give, this book tells the story of a sixteen-year old rapper, who pours her emotions into her first song, and ends up in the center of a controversy.

There is Genesis Begins Again by Alicia Williams. About a thirteen-year old girl who tries to lighten her skin many times, thinking that her dark skin is the source of all her family’s problems, before she finds reasons to love herself as she is.

Finally, there is We Are Displaced by Malala Yousafzai. This not only tells the story of Malala Yousafzai herself, but also of many other people she met in refugee camps and other places during her journeys.

You can read and rate any of these books, or your own choice books, and by filling out a slip, you can a win a book, a journal, and an opportunity to spin a prize wheel (which you can only do in August).

To find out more, please go to: https://sppl.bibliocommons.com/list/share/1165043747_sppl_teens/1397988357_teen_summer_spark_2019?_ga=2.67466577.1190286460.1556283232-6556837.1536076982.

Frankenstein

Frankenstein, is an old gothic novel written by Mary Shelley (or, as I like to call it, “All the reasons I hate Victor Frankenstein”).

I read this novel last year for school, expecting it to be wonderful, and I was disappointed, and this year, I have to read it again, so if I must suffer thus, you must suffer with me.

Let me begin with the good parts of this novel. I quite enjoy some of the plot and the ideas. Victor Frankenstein creates a being, and refuses to take responsibility for it because it is ugly, and after being rejected from society again and again, the being becomes a monster.

However, beyond the interesting discussions I can have about this book, I still do not enjoy it.

The novel is written in a way in which the same idea will be stated over and over again, multiple times in a chapter, in almost the same words. There are only so many times I can read “Victor was sad” on a page without wanting to chuck the book across a room. Beyond that, I found very little of the narration interesting, and the only way I could even slightly focus was by writing sarcastic comments down.

Which leads to my next problem, Victor Frankenstein, our narrator is the most annoying character I have ever had the misfortune of having to read. Victor is self-centered and refuses to take any responsibility. He will constantly state about how much he is suffering. His suffering is even worse than that girl who has been sentenced to death! Where everyone else is trying to cheer one another up, Victor refuses to do anything.

Overall, even though the themes and ideas of the book were good, the narration and style made it impossible for me to read.

Top five books to read in the library

Looking for something to read in the HPSH library? Here are the top five books (in my opinion) that you should read:

1. Crossover

This book was published on March 18, 2104, and the author is Kwame Alexander. The entire book is a novel in verse, which means each of the pages are short. This book is about two twin boys, Josh and Jordan Bell, who are the sons of a big time star basketball player Chuck Bell. Josh and Jordan love basketball like their father, and the boys experience normal life, relationships, and family time dealing with difficult moments. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves sports, especially basketball.

2. Rebound

This book has the same author as Crossover, but this one is about the father, Chuck Bell, and what he went through when he was his sons’ ages. After the death of his father, he skipped school, and didn’t do his schoolwork. Instead, he read comic books. He spends the summer at his grandparents home, and things start to get better as he begins to heal and explore new things.

3. Booked

This book is also written by Kwame Alexander, and he won the Goodreads Choice Award for best poetry for it. This book is the story of Nick, who loves soccer but hates to read books. He is  forced by his father to read dictionaries daily. Things take an unexpected turn when his parents announce that they are getting a divorce. I recommend this book to anyone who likes soccer and is into children’s fiction.

4. Long Way Down

Long Way Down is written by Jason Reynolds, and is a novel told in verse. This book has great reviews, and has won many awards. This book takes place in an elevator, and it focuses on Will, who is seeking to get revenge for the murder of his brother. As he travels down the elevator, the doors open on different  floors. Will is confronted by different figures from his past, each a victim of gun voilence, and each important to his life. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes fiction and who likes novels in verse books.

5. The Hate U Give

This book is written by Angie Thomas, has won many awards, and has great reviews. This book is about a 16-year-old black girl named Starr, who witnesses her friend getting shot by a white police officer. The story goes on with her finding justice for her friend by protesting, and testifying in court, about what she witnessed, with the help of her friends, family members. I recommend this book to anyone who is into young adult fiction.

Stan Lee: Creative legend

Last year, Stan Lee passed away at the age of 95. He died after suffering from a cardiac arrest brought on by respiratory heart failure. Many fans of the Marvel Universe were heartbroken when they heard the news. Many people loved and admired his work and were deeply saddened by his passing.

Stan Lee was born Stanley Martin Lieber on December 28, 1922. He was born in New York, to immigrant parents, and was always a talented writer.

He graduated high school early at the age of 16 and went on to pursue his creative calling. He started out working in the comic book office, that would one day become Marvel comics, as an assistant. He kept with the job and ended up contributing to his first comic book, Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge, in 1941.

Aside from writing comics, Stan Lee created a fulfilling life with his wife Joan. Together they had their daughter Joan Celia Lee. Stan and Joan were happily married for 70 years before his wive’s passing in 2014.

Stan Lee has been involved with the creation of most of the Marvel movies. These movies from Marvel Studios have been some of the most profitable.

Lee created Black Panther in 1966 with artist Jack Kirby. When the film Black Panther was released in 2018, it made over 700 million at the box office.

Some of Lee’s most popular comics were the Spider Man series, Fantastic Four and The X-Men. When asked, Lee has always said his favorite comic creation of his was the Silver Surfer.

Throughout his life, Stan Lee was able to build himself a successful career while doing something he loved. This passion can be seen in everything he produced, and that’s probably why his work was so successful. Stan Lee, the superhero legend, will be missed by not only his family, but by all his fans, young and old. 

Why are Ancient Greek concepts and stories still used today

Have you ever wondered why we still use books, stories, and information which came from people from a very long time ago?

Well, Ancient Greece brought up important ideas to the rest of the world – things like important advancements in mathematics, and creating concepts like democracy. They also created things such as theater, which is recognized all around the world today. They created their own style of architecture and art.

And, they had a religion which was called Hellenism, or Greek mythology today. The gods represented different aspects of life and nature (Poseidon is the god of the sea and earthquakes). Greek mythology has also been used today in books and movies such as Percy Jackson.

Stories from Ancient Greece are used really commonly today, but why?

Well, the first reason is because they are entertaining. For some reason it is entertaining watching Ancient Greek gods messing with the people that believe in them.

But not only are they entertaining but they can also teach you many things. The story of Orpheus and Eurydice teaches people about patience and trust in other people. Stories such as the one of Hades and Persephone teaches you about love but also teaches you about one’s greed. Stories like the Odyssey teach you about how bad it was to defy the gods of Greece, and how people back then thought that things like that would really happen to them if the did defy them. And stories like the Iliad show you events that happened back then in their perspective.

Greek stories are used today in school because they teach you lessons, show important character personality traits, and show important parts of reading. Like how in the Odyssey it shows Odysseus and how he, as the main character, gets himself and the rest of his men constantly in trouble. And this is because of his fatal flaw, he is very arrogant and prideful, and that goes on to be his downfall.

The idea of a fatal flaw is an aspect of English literature that is still relevant today. The concept of the fatal flaw can still be seen all over today’s movies, TV, and media. 

NaNoWriMo

by: Vivian S

Image taken from: https://nanowrimo.org/press Image courtesy of National Novel Writing Month

In July 1999, 21 people in the San Francisco Bay Area challenged one another to write 50,000 words in one month. Surprisingly, they found it fun and decided to continue on doing it. It has grown since then, with 394,507 people participating in 2017, in 646 regions.

National Novel Writing Month, also known as NaNoWriMo, is a challenge that anyone can take on to write 50,000 words of a novel in the month of November. They have a website where you can sign up and make an account, and it tracks your progress and tells you how many words you should write each day to complete that goal. With the website, you can receive pep talks from other authors, get support, meet other writers online, find out about events in your area, and all around challenge yourself. NaNoWriMo awards badges that you can earn over the month for your achievements.

Some novels written over the course of NaNoWriMo have been published and become successful. Examples include Marissa Meyer’s Cinder and Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl.

NaNoWriMo is run by a non-profit organization that hosts other events as well. They have a Young Writers Program and a Camp NaNoWriMo. They used to do a script writing event, but they don’t do it any longer.

In the Young Writers Program, you can participate alone or in a classroom. You can set word count goals and work toward them. Educators can create online classrooms where they can keep track of student progress.

In April and July, Camp NaNoWriMo is hosted, and it is where you set your own word count goals and work toward them.

Even after November, you are still urged to continue to work on your NaNoWriMo novel. In January and February, they host “Now What?” months where you can work on revising and publishing your novel.

NaNoWriMo is an event that anyone can take on to put words on paper (or computer) and challenge themselves.

For more information, go to https://nanowrimo.org

Inktober 2018

No, I did not misspell October.

Inktober is a month long drawing challenge that takes place during October. The challenge is to fully complete one ink drawing every day from October 1st through the 31st. The challenge was created by Jake Parker back in 2009 to help artists develop their skills and get in the habit of drawing every day. There aren’t many rules, just draw and complete a full piece every day, and upload it onto Instagram or any social media platform.

Some people wonder why Inktober is a challenge. Why not just draw every day? What makes Inktober more challenging than “drawing every day” is that you must fully complete the drawing. Personally I draw every day, but most commonly the drawings are just sketches, and not inked and completed pieces.

How do you come up with an idea every day? On the official Inktober website there is a prompt list. The first prompt list was created in 2016. Each year the prompts change, although I have noticed many of the prompts tend to be fall/Halloween themed. There is a different prompt for every day, and although most people follow these prompts it is never required. Some groups also make alternative prompt lists. Feel free to come up with your own ideas, or only follow your favorite prompts!

Now, you’re probably thinking I’m crazy right now. Thirty one days of drawing? If a whole month is too much for you, people also do a “half-marathon” (One drawing every other day) or a “5k” (One drawing a week). There is also some confusion about which art supplies to use. Originally, the challenge was to do just black and white ink. Now, people do color as well, but the official rules suggest limiting the amount of color that you use to one or a few colors. People have also done calligraphy, lettering, watercolors, and more. If you do decide to participate this year (It’s not to late!) or in the future, just remember that you are the artist – do this challenge to help yourself and have fun!

For more information on Inktober, or to see what other people are drawing, check out Inktober.com, @inktober, #inktober, and #inktober2018.