Why are phones so expensive?

By Toby Groves

Phones are crucial to all of our lives. They provide many great features that we all use every day. However, recently there has been an increase of prices from all major phone and tech companies, such as Apple or Samsung. Phones have gone from being $200-300 back in 2010 to being closer to $1,000 now. Many people have a problem with the price increase, so why are phones so expensive now?

There are a few reasons as to why phone prices have been skyrocketing over the past few years. The first reason is that in the US, flagship phones used to cost $200 as part of a mobile phone contract, while the majority of the providers, like AT&T, T-Mobile, etc. made most of their money through monthly fees. Now that those contracts are dead, phone prices are all stated outright. That explains why, several years ago, the iPhone’s price suddenly jumped up to $649.

Another big reason phones are so expensive is because they’re a lot harder to sell than they were back in 2010. Nowadays, almost everyone in America has a smartphone, or has made a conscious decision not to have one. There are very few people who have never heard of a smartphone, so the market to sell smartphones to new users is very scarce. 

Most often, the only reason someone would get a smartphone is to upgrade from their old phone to a newer model. Because of this, tech companies have made newer models stand out with great new features, rather than small bug fixes and minor hardware improvements. Making newer models is also an attempt to alienate older models, further pressuring users to upgrade to a more expensive phone. Even with all of these pressures on users, it is harder to sell an upgraded phone to a returning customer than to sell a phone to a new user.

The cost of building a phone has increased as well. New phones are expected to run at a certain speed, have a decent camera, and have a good user interface. The time and cost of these parts is large, and since companies need to make a profit, they sell the phone for more.

Phones are so expensive for many reasons, but as we move in to a tech-absorbed world, the increased price is just a side effect of the increased quality.

Read Brave

By: Vivian S

Are you looking for a new book to read, despite the fact that you never get around to reading anything, and your pile of recommendations is growing in the corner of your house, and you can’t motivate yourself to read them? So am I!

The Saint Paul Public Libraries are once again doing their yearly Read Brave program. Read Brave is a city-wide program where everyone is encouraged to read the same one or two books to learn about an issue facing our world.

The issue this year is climate justice. The main book is The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline, with a non-fiction option Climate Justice by Mary Robinson.

The Marrow Thieves is a dystopian young-adult novel, taking place in a future in which climate change has destroyed the whole world, and people no longer have the ability to dream. Indigenous people are the only ones still able to dream, and are hunted for it. The story follows Frenchie, who is on the run.

Climate Justice is about the impact climate change has on ordinary people, and their struggles to survive and find sustainable solutions.

I have not read these books, so most of that information came from their summaries (which aren’t always representative of what the book will be about).

At the end of the program, the Read Brave author, who this year is Cherie Dimaline, will visit Saint Paul and talk about the book. Dimaline will be coming March 11th through the 13th.

The book club will be reading The Marrow Thieves for their February meeting, and already have copies, so if you are interested, visit Ms. Rahman. The environmental club will be reading Climate Justice.

Read Brave is one of the biggest programs sponsored by the Saint Paul libraries, and an amazing opportunity to read a new perspective and meet an author. I, for one, will be taking advantage of this program.

The Game Awards

So the Game Awards happened again. The 2019 Game Awards. If you don’t know, the Game Awards is basically one giant advertisement for upcoming games, and they announce things like game of the year. Normally, I look forward to the Game Awards, but this year, it was kind of a mess.

First off, a few new things were announced, most notably, the Microsoft X series Xbox. The X series will launch in 2020, and features a console that is taller than it is wide. I’ve also noticed the controller looks a bit different from the current Xbox controller, and not in a good way. Before you buy it next year, make sure the grip is comfortable, ask a friend or something.

Before the game of the year was announced, Vin Diesel announced a new Fast and Furious game: Fast & Furious Crossroads. A trailer was shown, and from what I could tell at a glance, the gameplay looked good enough. I’ve never seen any of the Fast & Furious movies, but as far as I can tell it features people in cars shooting at each other. That sounds like fun, but this game has a major flaw in it.

It looks like garbage. Save for a few clips of cars in the trailer (which look like they were out of a cutscene anyways), this game is hard to look at. The character models look like bulky robots with human skin stretched over them, and then they lost half of their pixel count. Seriously, the models look like they were made at 480p when the rest of the game looks like 1080p.

Screenshot taken from: https://youtu.be/1bAtuMIIvyk

But that’s not nearly the only problem with the game in the trailer. First of all, there is lag. Take a moment to let that sink in. There is lag for the trailer to a game that the creators had time to edit and produce properly. If there is lag in the trailer, how much lag is there going to be in the actual game?

There is a bunch of other problems with the game, that just shows a lack of effort from the creators. For one, there is a scene where a car starts shooting at another car and hits it several times, but there are no bullet holes. The bullet effects themselves look more like lasers or energy than actual bullets. Also, and this part is kind of funny, there is an awkward animation of this guy jumping onto a train, and the animation is so ridiculously stupid it’s funny.

But this colossal fail of a trailer is nothing to the real problem of the Game Awards: the choice for best games of the year. Every year, the Game Awards sets up an online poll for a bunch of different awards, like the best action game of the year, or the best fighting game of the year. However, they have way to many categories, and that doesn’t work in their favor.

For the most part, I like how they have so many ways to vote. It shows appreciation to all of the genres, including indie titles, and gives all of the good games of the year a chance to win. However, this isn’t true in the slightest sense. The Game Awards are based on a vote, which means the most popular games are going to win. Nobody is going to vote for a game they haven’t even played. Also, only the pick for Game of the Year is actually said onstage, and the rest are shown online, meaning that they won’t receive any praise from a live audience.

When you break it down, the Game Awards this year were just a three hour slog of watching advertisements for video games, trailers for video games, and a disappointing game of the year announcement. In case you’re wondering, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice won, which admittedly looks like a cool game, but considering Super Smash Bros Ultimate was also in consideration, it doesn’t seem justified.

And that is the flaw with the Game Awards. Because they choose a variety of games on different consoles for game of the year, most people who vote will have only played one or two of those games. That turns voting into a popularity contest.

So does this mean that the Game Awards should pick game of the year a different way? Should they do it based on a Metacritic score, or get a group of professional reviews to voice their opinions? No, then people would feel even worse than they would when their favorite game loses. 

If you want my advice, which you do, because you are reading this article, just ignore the pick for game of the year. Hearing that Sekiro won doesn’t devalue how fun Smash is at all. If the Game Awards continue to put on an advertiser-first display every year, people will start to catch on. But until the show improves, I don’t plan on tuning in next year.

‘Red Dead Redemption 2’ review

Red Dead Redemption 2 was released on October 26th, of 2018. It was in the top 5 best games of the year, and has a huge fan base.

Red Dead Redemption 2 is an open world, old western game that takes place in the year 1899 and is a prequel to the original game. You play as a character by the name of Arthur Morgan, a big and tough outlaw who runs with the Van Der Linde gang. The Van Der Linde gang is run by a man by the name of Dutch Van Der Linde, a charming and like able man whose goal is to have the gang live free and avoid any government officials. The game starts with the gang in the snowy mountains, just barely escaping with their lives from a bank robbery that went wrong. 

Over time, they go out to rescue one of their teammates by the name of John Marston, the man you play as in the original game.

After a while, the characters in the gang you start to like begin getting killed off.

Eventually, the whole gang starts turning on each other and Arthur and John Marston start taking each other’s side against Dutch and Dutch becomes more crazy. By the end of Arthur’s story, Arthur gets John and his family out and away from the remaining members of the Van Der Linde gang and ends up dying (Arthur can die 4 different ways depending on the choices you make).

The epilogue in the game bridges it to the story of the first Red Dead Redemption game, bringing everything full circle.

This game’s story is what honestly made the game series a lot better. The original game is good but since this game is a prequel, it added a lot more color to the first game’s story, and overall the whole series.

The characters are well written and Arthur Morgan is a very good character; he is almost as good as the original character, John Marston. The choices you make in the game depend whether or not Arthur is a good person in the end, which makes it a lot better for you to not just go around and do bad things because there are consequences.

Dutch Van Der Linde in this game is as good as the original game and he changes a lot over time from a good man to an evil person. This helps to better explain his actions in the first game.

The gameplay in this is a lot better than the first because it’s not constant horse riding. When you are riding around on your horse there are a lot of random occurrences, or side missions, that make the game realistic or just plane entertaining to play for a while.

The graphics in this game are far better than most of the graphics in video games these days and it makes the game a lot more exciting.

The soundtrack is as well made as the original game, it’s very cinematic and the music is sad at a lot of points which makes it better. The music’s lyrics are highly based on the game’s story and often the music is different depending on the choices you make.

Overall, I give this game a solid 10/10

Places to visit this Christmas

Looking for somewhere to go this Christmas, here are some places to consider if you have the funds: 

  • London, England- London has great things during the holiday season like going on a Christmas river cruise, visiting one of the Royal Parks, and going ice skating at JW3.
  • The Maldives– The Maldives is a chain of 1192 islands located south-west of Sri Lanka and India in the Indian Ocean. Flying time from the United States to the Maldives takes about 20 hours, 4 minutes. In Maldives you can snorkeling, go diving, go fun tubing, have a private picnic on a sandbank, and go whale watching.
  • Jerusalem, IsraelIsrael is a holy city for Muslims, Jews, and Christians. You can explore the Western Wall, Holy Sepulcher, Tower of David, Bethlehem, Nazareth, the Sea of Galilee, the Golan Heights, Haifa, and the Mount of Olives.
  • Honolulu, HawaiiFrom Minnesota to Honolulu, Hawaii, it takes about 13 hours to fly. There are plenty of fun things to do in Hawaii like: go on a Makani Catamaran, go to the Honolulu Museum of Art, go to Pearl Harbor Historic Sites, go on a Diamond Head Hike, go to Waikiki Beach, and go snorkeling in Hanauma Bay.
  • San Jose, Costa RicaCosta Rica is a rainforested Central American country with coastlines on the Caribbean and Pacific. In Costa Rica you can go ziplining; it is one of the most essential things to do there. You can also go horseback riding, go on a sunset sailing cruise, go on a private boating tour in the Gulf of Papagayo, and you can go canoeing.

Visit these sites for more information: https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/travel-guide/g12919081/places-to-go-for-christmas/

‘Dungeons and Dragons’: The world’s greatest role-playing game

Dungeons and Dragons. What comes to mind when you heart those words? Perhaps you are a veteran of the tabletop role-playing game, and just hearing those words brings back memories of your adventures in the D&D world. More likely, you have no idea what I am talking about, and maybe think Dungeons and Dragons is some kind of video game. At the very least, one phrase comes to your mind: nerd stuff.

There is a common misconception that Dungeon and Dragons is only played by socially outcast nerds with no social life. I am here to dispel that myth; it is false. It’s not a video game either. D&D was made before video games existed. Instead, D&D is what is called a ‘tabletop role-playing game.’

But what does that mean? Basically, in D&D, there are two types of players: the Dungeon Master (called ‘DM’ for short) and the players. The DM referees the game, and is sort of the god of the world he creates. In a video game, he would be the system, the thing that controls all of the monsters and non-player characters, as well as describing the environment and world that the players are in. There is typically only one DM, and everyone else is a player. 

The players each create a character from a variety of races and classes, which are jobs, and they pretend to be their character, and react how their character would react in the world that the DM describes. The best part about character creation is that you can really be anything. If I want to be a dwarven merchant who lost his parents to a dragon attack when he was four and now wants revenge, I can.

Once characters are created, they enter the world that the Dungeon Master has created. He’ll describe the environment, and the players get to choose what they want to do with the scenario he has set up. This is the real draw of the game: the freedom. You can do anything in the D&D world if you want to. If the DM says, “you are surrounded by orcs, and help is miles away,” you can respond to that situation however you want. You can attack them, try to make peace, even bribe them to let you pass.

Does this mean there are no rules? No, of course not. The way randomness is handled in D&D is through the use of exotic dice, ranging from a four sided die to a 20 sided die, also called a d20. Whenever you want to attempt something that has a chance of failing, you roll a d20 and try to get over the DC, or difficulty class. For example, if you want to arm wrestle one of the aforementioned orcs to assert your dominance, the DM might say, “Okay! Roll a strength check.” You would roll your die, and if it got higher than the DC the DM set in his mind, then you succeed, and beat the orc in arm wrestling.

But of course, not everybody is going to have equal skill in every category. A rugged barbarian would have a better chance at beating the orc in arm wrestling than a shrimp wizard would. To show this in the gameplay, everybody has six different ability scores, which represent your expertise on one of the following attributes: strength, dexterity, constitution, intelligence, wisdom, and charisma. Each of these scores has a modifier, a bonus you add to your d20 roll that increase your chances of passing the DC. If a barbarian, who has a +4 to strength attempts to arm wrestle the orc, then the DC is technically 4 lower for him because if he rolls 4 under the DC, his check will still work because his strength modifier increase the total of the roll to be over the DC.

I know that’s a bunch of mumbo jumbo, but that is just the technical stuff, for those curious about how the game works. To sum it up, you pretend to be a character in a fictional world in your imagination, and you make decisions, as in that world, and the success of those decisions is determined by your dice rolls and how good your character is in that particular field. This system is the basis for the technical part of the game, to make sure the game is fair, but the rest of it is up to you. 

I’m serious about that. Although this game is designed for the world you create to have a medieval-fantasy setting, you can make it whatever you want. If you want your story to take place in outer space, you can do that! Want to add laser guns? Simple, just make up some basic stats for it, and it’s as good as real. Remember, the stats are not what drives this game, imagination is what is. As long as you adhere to the core rules, you should be fine.

Making your own things for D&D, whether they be rules, weapons and armor, classes, races, items, or anything else, this process is called, “homebrew.” Homebrewing your own things can really make your adventure stand out. But say you don’t have time to create your own stuff, you just don’t have the free time to whip up some unique ideas. First of all, as a DM, it takes a lot of planning and effort to make a successful adventure. You’re going to want to spend a lot of your free time preparing for the next time you play if you want to get into this game.

But for those who really don’t have the time, or just want to see what other D&D players, both DMs and players, have come up with, then may I suggest www.dandwiki.com? This site is home to thousands of user generated pages, including everything from homebrew classes and races, to entire settings for your worlds. The site even has fan-made content from existing fiction, meaning you can play as people like Link from the Legend of Zelda series, Iron Man from the Marvel franchise, and even Jedi Knights from Star Wars.

Why else should you use D&D Wiki? I would say that it really helps you understand the full concept of D&D itself. By spending time on fan-made pages, you learn how to effectively make your own homebrew stuff by seeing what others are doing. You may have a concept or idea in your head, but don’t know how to implement it into the game. Chances are, you can find a rule or take inspiration from something on the Wiki and use it in your game. 

Here’s the thing: www.dandwiki.com is currently blocked by the school, meaning you can’t use it on your iPad at all, even when you are at home. Now, I know that the school has good reasons for blocking sites, and those reasons usually boil down to one of two things: they are not appropriate or they waste time. Allow me to explain why D&D wiki should not be blocked for either of these reasons.

First, the argument that this site wastes time in school. Well it’s true that I would spend a considerable amount of time on the site, both in and out of school, that doesn’t change a thing about wasted time. There are plenty of ways to waste time on your school iPad, even if the district were to block all the gaming sites in the world. Basically, using your iPad to waste time is a choice that the student makes, and blocking time wasting sites is not an incentive not to waste time.

Secondly, this site is by no means inappropriate. It’s true that Dungeons & Dragons is a generally mature game, that usually refers to the mental age required to play it effectively rather than if it has blood or not. You have to be older to play it, but that doesn’t mean every game is an edgy blood soaked battlefield. It’s up to the DM and players to agree upon if they will describe mature things in the game. There is a total ban on all foul language and mature content on D&D Wiki, if that is the issue.

So yeah, that sums up my article on Dungeons and Dragons. If this sounds like something you would enjoy, go ahead and check it out. All you really need to play is a Player’s Handbook, which you can find online for like $30. If you want to check it out, you can buy a starter pack for even cheaper, which gives you a premade adventure and premade characters for you to play. 

Also, as it turns out, the co-creator of D&D, David Lance Arneson, is a graduate from this very school! I didn’t even know that until I wrote this article. I mean, I knew the game was made by people in Minnesota and Wisconsin, but I never knew how close I really was to the creators of this game. 

If you want to find out more about David, check out this article:  https://www.minnpost.com/mnopedia/2019/05/david-arneson-the-co-creator-of-dungeons-dragons-developed-the-game-in-minnesota/

So, if you have a creative mind, and are feeling bored with the limited choices of video game adventures, then consider playing one of my favorite games of all time: Dungeons & Dragons.

The television

Once upon a time there was a world with no streaming services. If you even had a television, you couldn’t binge watch all you favorite shows. You couldn’t just watch T.V. at anytime in any place. You couldn’t even decide what you wanted to watch. You would watch what was on. Your parents were the remote control for you grandparents. Before remote controls, there were buttons connected to the giant box we called the T.V. 

The first showing of a working television was on January 26th, 1926. There were three crucial inventors of the television: John Logie Baird, Philo Farnsworth, and Charles Francis Jenkins. It was first made in the Jenkins Factory. It cost between $1000 and $3000. It was a large cube with a screen less than half the size of the box.

The first advertisement for the television aired in 1941. 

The first television remote was developed by Zenith Radio Corporation in 1950. it was attached by a wire and had big and bulky buttons.

In the 1990’s ‘‘streaming’’ was first named as a demand service but never really became a thing until 2008 when Hulu first came out. Hulu was owned by NBC and Fox. 

There are so many streaming services that they really took business away from cable networks. There’s Hulu, Netflix, HBO, Amazon Prime Video, Sling TV, Playstation Vue, fuboTV, CBS All Access, Disney+, and so many more. Cable networks are slowly being shut down and suddenly you have a million Netflix and Hulu originals like The Handmaid’s Tale, Stranger Things, etc. 

The television is slowly getting bigger and bigger physically. The variety of shows is getting bigger as well.

Many people say that watching television lets them explore different perspectives and have a world away from our own. Others believe that the same thrill of escaping can be found in books. As people continued to make and buy televisions the new ideas for shows expanded. People began to become invested in a character’s life. 

*Disclaimer* I am not hating on any streaming services, just simply writing about the changes that have happened with television. Thank you.

‘Red Dead Redemption’ spoiler review

By: Isaac Basques

The first Red Dead Redemption game was released on May 18th, of 2010. It was released by the game company Rockstar games.

The game is an open world, set in the old west, with a 10 hour long main story, along with a ton of side stories and missions for you to do. It’s a third person shooter but also a game that the player can just ride around and enjoy the scenery or story.

In this game, you play a character by the name of John Marston, a former outlaw, who’s family is held hostage by the government who are forcing him to kill off the remaining members of his old gang who left him for dead in a train heist years back.

John goes through helping tons of people in order to get to his old gang members and finish them off. Everything eventually leads to John killing off, or capturing, his old gang members (since it is a choice in the game). His old gang members names are Javier Esquella and Bill Williamson.

After John finishes them both off, he soon finds out that his old gang leader who taught him to read and was basically a father to him, is still alive. His name is Dutch Van Der Linde. John finds him and watches him end his own life.

After finally doing what John needs to do, he goes home to see his family and soon after gets shot and left for dead by the government, along with a family member of theirs by the name of Uncle. 3 years later, John’s son Jack finds the government man behind his father’s death and finishes him off.

This game, in my opinion, is by far one of the most well written video games. It isn’t necessarily a happy story at all, but it makes you feel like it is, due to its light hearted jokes from time to time and its constant fun with action.

The main character, John Marston, is very well written and you can really feel his struggle with the fact that he really does not want to kill his old gang, despite the fact that they left him for dead. He just wants to live a normal life with his family on his ranch. John his very tough and ready for a fight, I’d like to say he’s not to be messed with, but he honestly gets used one too many times by too many people, and he just kind of lets it slide. Other than that, John Marston is a great character.

The other character in this game that I think they did an amazing job with, is John’s old gang leader, Dutch Van Der Linde. Dutch is a charming, yet evil man, who you can tell lost his mind years ago and hasn’t been the same since. The chemistry between him and John Marston feels very real and it actually feels as if John once saw him as a father figure. His final moment in the game is one of the best parts in the whole game because of the long speech he makes that strongly indicates that what John Marston is going through is not going to end well.

The graphics for this game are beautiful, especially for its time. The sunsets look like actual sunsets and the landscapes are just very nice to look at while you ride on your horse.

The gameplay for this game is overall not the best. The shootouts in the game can be fun but it often gets pretty boring just riding your horse around to area to area for long periods of time. You often spend more time riding your horse around in this game than you do actually playing the story.

Sometimes it makes up for the more boring moments when you come across strangers or small occurrences here and there, but other than that, there isn’t that many exciting things that happen when you’re playing.

It’s often drawn out for far too long, but there’s a lot of elements in this game that make you really have fun with it, such as the soundtrack when you ride your horse for certain missions, or really cool gun fights, and etc.

Which brings me to the soundtrack. The soundtrack is very good in this game and is western type music, but makes it feel a little more modern day and not too country like. They put the music in at a lot of good moments in the game so you can have a strong connection to it. 

Overall, I give this game a solid 9.5/10

Should you get Disney+?

I think it was no secret when Disney came out with Disney+ on November 12, 2019. But, though it sounds packed with an endless amount of shows and movies, should you get it?

First of all, Disney+ is a streaming service recently launched by Disney. It has a variety of shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, and National Geographic. It is packed with hours of classic Disney movies and series from many years ago, as well as newer content. Specifically, it has about 500 movies and 7,500 TV shows. 

To be fair, Disney has done a really nice job at making Disney+ affordable for many people. At $7 per month or $70 per year, it’s less expensive than Netflix’s cheapest option at $9 per month. Also, unlike Netflix, they do not charge extra money for quality changes. 

Personally, one of my favorite benefits of Disney+ is its ability to download. All of the shows on Disney’s streaming service have a small button that you can click that allows you to download them. This means that for road trips or vacations where there may not be internet or a bad connection to WiFi, you could just download what you’d like to watch on the app and have it available any time, anywhere. 

Disney+ will also be adding content as it continues to be used. Many newer shows will also appear after their appearances in the theater and as a home-video, including movies like the realistic version of Disney’s The Lion King.

There is a good chance that there is something you will enjoy watching on there. After all, it was announced they reached over 10 million people that have already subscribed. 

So, in the end, I would definitely recommend this to anyone who is interested in the content that Disney produces. If you subscribe and pay the monthly fee, you can cancel at any time. If you don’t know whether or not you should, there is a seven day free trial that might help you to make up your mind. 

‘Untitled Goose Game’ review

Untitled Goose Game is a game where you play as a goose who tries his best to mess with the inhabitants of his village. Released by House House on September 20th, it has since been praised with critical acclaim, as well as a 98% “liked it” score according to Google Users. But is this game really that good? Does it deserve the 81/100 on Metacritic? Let’s find out.

The first thing you notice about Untitled Goose Game is how it looks. For starters, there is very minimal outlines on anything, and shadows are often subtly shaded so they are generally unnoticeable if you are not looking for them. This gives the entire game a cartoony vibe, but does it in a way that doesn’t sacrifice depth. It’s very hard to explain without pictures, so here one is:

Everything you need to know about this game can be seen in the picture above. You are a Goose, and your job is to steal the human’s belongings and mess with their lives every way you can. The game has a unique art style, not one I particularly like, but definitely one I don’t despise. 

Untitled Goose Game has simple controls. You move around with the control stick, can zoom in or out with the triggers, and you press A to grab stuff with your beak. You can grab most things, whether they are apples, radios, or even harmonicas. Oh yeah, you also have a honk button, which does just what you think it does. With this dedicated arsenal, you are ready to control the townspeople to your every whim.

The music in this game plays a big role in the over all experience, although not in the way you would expect. There is no real soundtrack, no background music that plays during the game. However, whenever you try to attempt something, like sneaking up on a villager, classical music will play at the same intensity as the situation. In this example, it would start to play creeping piano music as you approached the villager, and the music will intensify when you start to steal their stuff.

This is a good base for a game, but in my opinion, this entire game is lacking in fun. Even though it is a sandbox game, it feels like there is nothing to do. You have a checklist of things you need to do to beat the game, like locking the Boy in the telephone booth or getting the Groundskeeper to hit his own hand with the hammer. The game doesn’t tell you how to do this, so you have to use your limited arsenal of honks and beak grabs to achieve everything. Sometimes, this is simple, like honking at the exact moment the Groundskeeper attempts to hit the sign with his hammer.

But because the game doesn’t give you any hints on how you have to figure things out, every puzzle in the game is one you need to solve on your own. Normally, I like puzzle games, but because this game doubles as a stealth game, there is no sense of progression when solving puzzles. In a game like Portal, you have every piece of the puzzle, and through trial and error, you can slowly figure out how to solve a puzzle. In Untitled Goose Game, there is still trial and error, but instead of discovering new ways to solve the puzzle, you simply try the same thing over and over again, waiting a while in between attempts for the villagers you are messing with to go to the spot you want them to.

That’s my main problem with this game. I have some other minor issues, like how the camera never really angles itself on what you want, and there are no camera controls besides zooming in and out, which don’t really accomplish much. It doesn’t ruin the experience by any means, but I wish there was someway to toggle the zoom out button so you didn’t have to hold it.

So, is this game worth it? Despite its flaws, is it worth the 20 dollar Nintendo Eshop price? I would argue not. Even though it has the word “game” in its title, I don’t really consider it a game. It’s an experience, something you’ll play a few times to fulfill that desire to mess with some people for a few hours. At best, I would wait for one of your friends to buy it, and then just play it when you’re at their place. 

My final rating for Untitled Goose Game is 6/10.