Math team at HPSH

The Math team at Highland is mainly directed by Mr. O’Connell and Mr. Anderson. The Math team meets every Monday and Wednesday at 3:15-4:15 in Mr. O’Connell’s room on the second floor, room: 2305. The season typically goes from early October to early March. 

In Math team there are four different “events.” “Events” are the different sections of math that you can try and compete in. There is Event A, Event B, Event C, and Event D. The content in these events change after every meet. 

During practice, on Mondays and Wednesdays, you get your events and snacks as well. You must choose two events that you would like to compete in. There is also always at least one teaching. The teachings are on what you will most likely need to know when it comes to the questions that will show up in the events. 

Practice on these events is done by completing the different events that were given in the past years. There is one given each year of each event section. 

You get 12 minutes to complete each event. This time limit is used during both practice and the actual meets. During a meet, you get 12 minutes to complete each event. You also get scratch paper that you may use to solve the problems. There are typically 4 problems on each event.

Each meet is typically around 2 hours. The meets take place in other SPPS schools, and you get meal tickets that get you food. For food there is usually pizza and pop. There is a bus that takes you to the other school and a bus that takes you back to Highland. 

In order to join the math team there is a fee of $35. Math team gives you a chance to enhance your knowledge on math, meet new people, go to other schools, and it looks great on college resumes, so why not give it a try! 

‘Coraline’ review

Button eyes and spiderwebs, Coraline is full of the stuff of nightmares.

Coraline was originally a novella written by Neil Gaiman, published all the way back in 2002. It quickly won many awards, which may I say, it deserved. In 2009 it was adapted into a stop motion film by Laika, which also appears to be quite well received. 

And in this one occasion, the movie may be just as good as the book.

Coraline is about a young girl, called Coraline, who has just moved to a new house. She feels as though her parents don’t pay enough attention to her, and she’s slightly ignored, not to mention bored. Then, she finds a small door in her house, which was originally boarded up, but suddenly one night, it is not. It leads Coraline to a fantastical world with two other parents and all the stuff she could ever want. But her other mother has more plans than just trying to make Coraline happy, and Coraline must fight not only for her own life, but also her parents’, to get out of the other mother’s world.

The book and the movie do have some differences though, the movie spends much more time exploring the world and characters, while the book is very fast paced. 

The book and movie are listed as horror, so while they are aimed at children, they are also full of ghoulish imagery. For example, the scene in the movie with Misses Forcible and Spink; trust me, you do not want to know that scene.

Neil Gaiman is also the author of novels such as American Gods, Good Omens, Anansi Boys, and more.

Laika, the studio that made the movie, also has made other movies such as Paranorman, Kubo and the Two Strings, and recently Missing Link.

I cannot recommend Coraline high enough. The book is short and a fun read, and I could rewatch the movie over and over again. If you are looking for a spooky movie to watch after Halloween, or just a fun time, Coraline is a must-see.