Debate at HPSH

Debate is a club that is open to all students at Highland. Debate meets on Mondays and Thursdays at 3:15-5:00 in Ms. Becker’s room (room 2214). The type of debate at Highland Park is Policy Debate. 

If you’re new to debate then you can start off as a Rookie and then move on to be a Novice, JV, and finally, a Varsity debater. 

In debate you get to work with a partner. You and your partner debate against another person and their partner. The main idea is to convince the judge that your side/ideas (Affirmative or Negative) are better than the other side. 

Once you join debate you get a topic that you will have to debate about. This year’s topic is the selling of arms to foreign countries. The proposition is: “The United States federal government should substantially decrease Foreign Military Sales and Direct Commercial Sales of arms to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” 

The Affirmative side in a debate agrees with the proposition. Their job is to convince the judge that their plan is better and if it doesn’t go through then bad things will happen. In this case, the affirmative’s job is to convince the judge that the United States should stop selling weapons to Saudi Arabia, and if the United States doesn’t stop selling them then bad things will happen.

The Negative side in a debate disagrees with the proposition. Their job is to convince the judge that the affirmative’s proposition won’t work and we should leave everything as it is or else bad things will happen. In this case, the negative’s job is to convince the judge that the United States should keep selling weapons to Saudi Arabia because if they don’t then bad things will come from it. 

Debate tournaments usually go on for two days. Usually, Fridays and Saturdays. A debate tournament is around as long as a school day and you get to debate around 2-4 rounds depending on the tournament. 

If you want to work on/and or like to:

  • Speak in front of others
  • Analyze text
  • Come up with questions
  • Prove others wrong
  • Argue
  • Meet new people
  • Learn about politics 

then I suggest you join the Highland Park Debate Team!

Volunteering at the Minnesota Children’s Museum

 


The Minnesota Children’s Museum (MCM) is all about learning through the act of play. As a Play Team volunteer at the MCM, one must interact with children and find their inner playful side. 

In order to be a MCM Play Team volunteer, one must be in 9th – 12th grade. 

MCM Play Team volunteers must volunteer for, usually, a four hour shift. Shifts are available from:

Friday, 5pm-8pm

Saturday, 8:45am-12:45pm

Saturday, 12pm-4:30pm

Saturday, 3:45pm-8pm

Sunday, 8:45am-12:45pm

Sunday, 12pm-4:30pm

These are the shifts that are available during the school year. Each volunteer must complete a minimum of 10 shifts before the end of the school year. These 10 shifts may be scattered throughout the school year, but one of the 10 shifts must be on a “Target Free Sunday.” 

“Target Free Sunday” occurs once a month and it is when the museum allows visitors to go in for free. Typically, these days get very busy and one’s normal responsibilities change, along with the schedule.

A regular schedule at the museum starts off with “Daily Development” which is supposed to warm you up for the museum floor. At “Daily Development,” volunteers get to interact with other volunteers and play games, as well as finding the deeper meaning to those games. 

After “Daily Development,” everyone gets their schedules and are ready to go onto the floor. 

Schedules consist of around 6 different shifts, and each shift lasts 30 minutes. During a shift you go to an area in the museum and interact with children to help them learn through play. 

Around 15 minutes before the end, all the volunteers head to the volunteer area and end with “Reflection.” “Reflection” is very similar to “Daily Development,” but it’s at the end instead of the beginning. At “Reflection,” volunteers reflect on how their day was and how they could better improve as volunteers. 

Being a volunteer at the MCM allows you to play, learn, and teach alongside other teens and children. 

If you would like to become a volunteer at the Minnesota Children’s Museum email: 

volunteers@mcm.org

Ballet Folklorico

image taken from: tps://www.anmbf.org/

Ballet Folklórico is one of the many ways to express Mexican culture. Ballet Folklórico is a dance that represents all of the regions in Mexico; therefore, it has many different types of dances, clothing, and music within the category. 

These dances were practiced and performed as early as the 17th century and started to become more popular in the 18th century, after the War of Independence. 

The most popular and widely known type of Folklorico is the Folklorico dances of Jalisco. A traditional Folklorico Jalisco dress is made of a fabric called poplin. The colors of the dresses are strong such as red, Mexican pink, and yellow. The shirt part of the dress has sleeves that go up to the elbow. Both the skirt and the dress are decorated with ribbons that match the dress. 

The men wear a typical charro suit which is made up of long tight pants with decorations on the sides. Along with the pants there is a matching jacket and silk tie. They also wear a wide-brimmed hat, or sombrero, with the outfit. 

All Folklorico dances consist of a lot of movement of the whole body. There is a lot of footwork, legwork, use of the torso, and armwork. In many dances the ladies use their skirts with coordination and elegance to produce beautiful waves of color emanating from their dresses.

Others, such as the style of Gerruero, use other forms to get the people’s attention besides using their skirts. Guerrero dances consist of both males and females using a pañuelo (handkerchief) while they dance, moving it in an infinity symbol like motion.

In many other dances such as those from Nayarit and Colima, the men use machetes while they dance, producing a loud noise and a great reaction from their audiences. 

There are many groups all around the world that teach the wonders of Ballet Folklorico that usually focus on all the different types of dances from all the regions in Mexico. Joining a group allows one to connect with their Mexican culture or learn of Mexican culture, and this makes learning Ballet Folklorico all the more fun.