North Korea gets U.S. and South Korea war plans

Early on morning of October 11, North Korean hackers were able to hack into the South Korean government computers and stole about 235 GB of data. The stolen data included 300-lower classified, confidential documents, and there were also classified wartime plans drawn up by the U.S. and South Korea.

Mr. Rhee Cheol-hee, a South Korean lawmaker, had stated to reporters that one of the documents that was stolen included South Korea’s military plan of removing North Korea leader, Kim Jong-Un, if war between the Korean Peninsula breaks out. The hackers had used a computer vaccine service, and South Korea had been able to trace the IP address, of the vaccine, which originated in Shenyang, China.

In 2010, the U.S. broke into North Korea’s computer system; targeting Reconnaissance General Bureau, which is North Korea’s equivalent of the US C.I.A. Last month, U.S. strategic bombers, and fighters jets, flew along the East Coast of North Korea. North Korea claimed a right to shoot any American warplanes flying near the country.

The Pentagon hasn’t yet released a statement, but spokesperson, Army Col. Rob Manning, stated that “I can assure you we are confident in our security in our operations plans and our ability to deal with any threat from North Korea.” He also added, “The operations plan that they are referring to is a bilateral plan, so the Republic of Korea-U.S. alliance remains steadfast in their commitment to make sure they safeguard that information and ensure readiness on Korean Peninsula to counter any North Korean threats.”

Trump tweeted on Monday, October 9th, “Our country had been unsuccessfully dealing with North Korea for 25 years, giving billions of dollars and getting nothing. Policy didn’t work.” He then tweeted later in the afternoon “Presidents and their administrations had been talking to North Korea for 25 years, agreements been made and massive amounts of money had been paid…hasn’t worked, agreements violated before the ink was dry, making fools of US negotiators. Sorry but only one thing will work!” When the reporters asked Trump what he meant by his tweets his only response was “You’ll figure it out pretty soon.”

US military crash In Syria

On early Friday, September 29, a US Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey aircraft crashed in Syria due to an unknown reason. There is still an ongoing investigation, but it is assumed to be an mechanical issue. The aircraft had around 2 dozen Marines abroad and two members were injured, but according to Operation Inherent Resolve, the injuries was considered non-life-threatening. The injured members were transported to a medical facility and examined.

According to CNN, the military official told them that the hard landing completely destroyed the plane, and that it was not due to enemy activities. The aircraft crashed early in the morning, in a combat zone at a base. The base was where the U.S. maintains Special Operations forces and artillery support. Operation Inherent Resolve released a statement confirming that the crash did happen, but did not give the location. They gave a vague response, saying it was in the Middle East. Later, the officials were able to tell the location of the crash, which was Syria.

The Pentagon will not disclose either names or series affiliation in this mishap. Right now, the U.S. has more than 1,000 troops in Syria. Ospreys are often used to transport troops within Syria. U.S. advisers are working with Syrian Democratic Forces to train them in combat and against Islamic State militants. Earlier this year, the Marines established an outpost in Syria against Islamic State forces, preventing them from retaking hold of the northern city of Raqqa. The U.S. also backed Arab and Kurdish fighters, with Syrian Democratic forces, to secure Raqqa Old City on September 4. U.S. troops had been in Syria since October 2015, to support Operation Inherent Resolve.

On Friday, the 29th, lots of reports from doctors and medical aid groups say that many of the hospitals are at risk for being targeted. Syrian troops had began targeting hospitals, which is considered violating a human rights rule. Human rights groups have protested that the Syrian troops have been violating the rule in “an egregious violation of the laws of war and a callous attempt to inflict suffering on civilians.” According to Physicians for Human Rights, the latest attacks were the most intense since April. Brice de Vingne, of Doctors Without Borders, said that the attacks had been taking place near Idlib. The United Nations has deemed attacks against hospitals a systematic attempt by the Syrian government to target health care facilities.

Minnesota ACT scores

By: Pachia Lee, Eddie Lopez, Melissa Tapia

Minnesota ACT scores are considered one of the nation’s best and had beat the national average many times. Last year though, there was a dropped in the ACT Scores, but Minnesota’s average was still higher than the national average. This year, the ACT scores have increased again after last year’s decline.

According to CBS Minnesota, Minnesota’s class of 2017 ACT scores rebounded from their dip in 2016, and remain among America’s best. Minnesota students had an average score of 21.5 on the exam while the national average was 21. Minnesota was also one of the 17 states to have all 100% of the graduating class take the ACT. Supporters of this requirement said this would bring more opportunities for all students because all students had a chance to take the ACT.

More than 17,000 Minnesota students took the ACT, especially an increased number of minority students. The Hispanic subgroup had the greatest increase with 1,709 students taking the ACT and there was also an overall increase of minority group ACT Scores by 0.5 points.

According to MN Office of Higher Education, Minnesota’s average score was still higher than the national average even with the drop. Also, 31% of 2017 graduates met all four ACT college-ready areas compared to in 2016 where only 29% were proficient in all four areas.

Graduates who had taken three or more years of math had an average score of 22.2 compared to others who took math for less than two years. Those students had an average score of 17.1. About 45% of graduates indicated that they were interested in STEM majors or careers. In 2017, 79 Minnesota students achieved a perfect ACT score meaning they scored 36 overall in four subject areas.