Should you make a New Year’s resolution?

By Maddie Baggenstoss, Claire Ramadan, and Daniela Fernandez 

The New Year, a time for resolutions that will swirl down the drain by late February. What was once sparked by confetti and noisemakers is most likely destined to later crumble under cheesecake and binge watching. Whether it’s to workout, to eat healthy, or be a kinder person, the fun ends by January 3rd when we begin to miss our old vices. Will the destructive cycle of forgotten New Year’s Resolutions ever end?

Although New Year’s Resolutions can seem like a productive and achievable idea, many don’t often realize the cons that come with it.

One thing that many people don’t realize is that they will most likely end up quitting something cold turkey; sugar, smoking, drinking, etc. It takes about 21 days to start a new habit, which by then, most people stop their New Year’s resolutions.

Although ceasing bad habits abruptly is a method of improving, lots of people struggle with it. This is because many have the possibility to experience withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can affect mood, productivity, and energy levels among other things.

When trying something new, or quitting something old, it is almost always best to ease into new habits slowly; or at least not that quickly. Choosing to make a huge change in your life can be very overwhelming, and huge changes don’t happen overnight.

Many people will attempt to stick to their New Year’s resolutions, but the truth is that they are often way too much way to fast. For example, you may decide you will workout everyday beginning on January first. That’s a big goal, and we’re sure you could do it. Or you could start by working out a few times a week, and build up to it everyday. You may be more likely to reach your goal if you start small and stick with it rather than diving right in, and then quitting after a week.

The real question is: Should I make a New Year’s resolution? Ultimately, whether or not you want to make a New Year’s resolution is completely up to you. If you are able to set goals and stick with them, no problem, then this may be just another excuse for you to make a positive change to your life.

Even if you’re not so sure you can give up that amazing slice of pie that easily, we still encourage you to try. You don’t have to eat a perfect diet of fruits and vegetables right away. No step towards your goal is too small.

Whatever your goal is, do your best to get to achieve it. Get there at your own pace. What do you have to lose?

Senior meeting

On January 10th, We had our second senior class meeting. It was basically a meeting where we talked about making sure we are on track to graduate and also about graduation. You could feel the excitement in the room as we are going into our second semester of our last year in high school. We talked about three main things: keeping grades up, senior field trip, and cap and gowns.

Grades

Seniors have been in high school for about 3 years now and are familiar with keeping grades up in order to pass a class and go on to the next grade.

Well, when senior year hits, students tend to think that there isn’t much effort needed in order to graduate, which is false.

In the meeting, counselors talked about how students tend to take it easy and not care as much and end up failing a class which prohibits them from being able to graduate. We should still care about our grades because of that, but also because colleges are still going to be looking at our grades even after they have accepted us. It is important that we seniors take this advice and do it.

Cap And Gown

The second half of the senior meeting involved making sure you fit your cap and gown perfectly. Making sure you look your best during graduation day is key when it comes to walking down that stage with your diploma in hand.

The seniors were given a short link, to type on their phones, which opened up a site, which basically got them ready for ordering their cap and gowns. On this website, the seniors had to type out their personal information like their name and email, and they had to put down their weight, and height.

An important reminder went out to the people wearing heels… “If you plan on wearing heels, you need to add on an inch or more when writing down your height.”

Senior Field Trip

The seniors were also given permission slips to the next senior field trip, which will happen on February 7th, on a Thursday. The field trip starts at 9:15am and goes to 1:00pm. The fee is $18 which covers a bus ride, and two hours of SNOW TUBING.

This field trip was planned by the senior class council, and the rest of the student class voted on it.

Permission slips are due back by Tuesday, January 29th, to Ms. Zepeda in the counseling office. Any questions, please talk to Ms. Esso.

 

The Golden Globes

The 76th Golden Globe Awards honored the best in film and American television of 2018, as chosen by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Produced by Dick Clark Productions and the HFPA, the 76th Golden Globe Awards was broadcast live on January 6, 2019, from The Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California beginning at 5:00 p.m. PST / 8:00 p.m. EST. The ceremony aired live on NBC in the United States. Actors Sandra Oh and Andy Samberg hosted the ceremony.

The nominees were announced on December 6, 2018 by Terry Crews, Danai Gurira, Leslie Mann, and Christian Slater. The ceremony marked the debut of a new non-competitive award rewarding excellence in television, the Carol Burnett Award, with Carol Burnett herself being the inaugural recipient, along with a brand new trophy design.

Green Book won the most awards for the ceremony with three, including Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. Bohemian Rhapsody and Roma won two awards each. In television, The Kominsky Method and The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story were the most awarded, with two awards each. Jeff Bridges was honored with the Cecil B. DeMille Award for career achievement.

This is a complete list of the winners:   
Movies

Best Motion Picture, Drama:

Bohemian Rhapsody

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy:

Green Book

Best Director, Motion Picture:

Alfonso Cuarón, Roma

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama:

Glenn Close, The Wife

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama:

Rami Malek, Bohemian Rhapsody

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy:

Olivia Colman, The Favourite

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy:

Christian Bale, Vice

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture:

Regina King, If Beale Street Could Talk

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture:

Mahershala Ali, Green Book

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture:

Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie and Peter Farrelly, Green Book

Best Motion Picture, Animated:

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Best Motion Picture, Foreign Language:

Roma

Best Original Score, Motion Picture:

Justin Hurwitz, First Man

Best Original Song, Motion Picture:

“Shallow” — A Star Is Born

Television

Best Television Series, Drama:

The Americans, FX

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Drama:

Sandra Oh, Killing Eve

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Drama:

Richard Madden, Bodyguard

Best Television Series, Musical or Comedy:

The Kominsky Method, Netflix

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Musical or Comedy:

Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Musical or Comedy:

Michael Douglas, The Kominsky Method

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, FX

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television:

Patricia Arquette, Escape at Dannemora

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television:

Darren Criss, The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:

Patricia Clarkson, Sharp Objects

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television:

Ben Whishaw, A Very English Scandal