The television

Once upon a time there was a world with no streaming services. If you even had a television, you couldn’t binge watch all you favorite shows. You couldn’t just watch T.V. at anytime in any place. You couldn’t even decide what you wanted to watch. You would watch what was on. Your parents were the remote control for you grandparents. Before remote controls, there were buttons connected to the giant box we called the T.V. 

The first showing of a working television was on January 26th, 1926. There were three crucial inventors of the television: John Logie Baird, Philo Farnsworth, and Charles Francis Jenkins. It was first made in the Jenkins Factory. It cost between $1000 and $3000. It was a large cube with a screen less than half the size of the box.

The first advertisement for the television aired in 1941. 

The first television remote was developed by Zenith Radio Corporation in 1950. it was attached by a wire and had big and bulky buttons.

In the 1990’s ‘‘streaming’’ was first named as a demand service but never really became a thing until 2008 when Hulu first came out. Hulu was owned by NBC and Fox. 

There are so many streaming services that they really took business away from cable networks. There’s Hulu, Netflix, HBO, Amazon Prime Video, Sling TV, Playstation Vue, fuboTV, CBS All Access, Disney+, and so many more. Cable networks are slowly being shut down and suddenly you have a million Netflix and Hulu originals like The Handmaid’s Tale, Stranger Things, etc. 

The television is slowly getting bigger and bigger physically. The variety of shows is getting bigger as well.

Many people say that watching television lets them explore different perspectives and have a world away from our own. Others believe that the same thrill of escaping can be found in books. As people continued to make and buy televisions the new ideas for shows expanded. People began to become invested in a character’s life. 

*Disclaimer* I am not hating on any streaming services, just simply writing about the changes that have happened with television. Thank you.

The Good Club Vol. 2: Food drive

By: Vivian S.

One of Highland Park’s newest clubs is back at it again. The Good Club will be holding a food drive this week.

They will be collecting donations of food and/or hygiene products up until December 12th, when later that night, during parent-teacher conferences, they will be passing out the food to HP students next to the auditorium from 5-7pm.

If you have any donations, you can bring them to Ms. Jane’s room or Ms Ostendorf’s room (2207 and 2208).

So, once again, to find out more, I interviewed Cailin and Delaney, two of the people running the club.

Please note that these are not direct quotes. 

V: What is your goal for the food drive?

C&D: To make food security less of a taboo topic in our school, as many of our students do need food, we’re hoping to make it more normalized.

V: What do you want people to donate, and is there anything you do not want?

C&D: Anything is fine, especially canned and boxed food, stuff kids can make for themselves. Not fresh produce, milk, or eggs though. Healthier options if you have any.

V: What do you plan on doing with any remaining food?

C&D: There is a food shelf here, so it’s going to be put there, and if there isn’t enough room, the rest will go to a local food shelf.

V: Do you plan on doing it again?

C&D: Yes, if given the opportunity and resources to do it again, we’ll do it again.

V: How much more food do you need to reach your goal?

C&D: A lot, we don’t have a goal, we just want as much food as possible.

V: How are you getting donations, and who from? I heard you talking about getting donations from Cub and a dentist’s?

C&D: Members of the club reached out to specific stores to ask for donations, and neighbors and friends. 

V: Why did you choose to do a food drive?

C&D: Hunger is something that isn’t really talked about in our school, and we wanted to bring awareness to it as it is important.

V: Do you have any plans for your next project?

C&D: No.