Justin Trudeau blackface

Justin Trudeau, Canada’s Prime Minister, decided to wear brownface to a party held at a private school. Justin once taught at that private school in 2001.

There’s a photograph that has been leaked of the incident, and the photograph was taken at an “Arabian Nights” themed party.

Trudeau apologized saying, “I shouldn’t have done that and should’ve known better but I didn’t. I’m really sorry.”

Trudeau also wore blackface when he was singing a Jamaican folk song by a African American civil rights activist. That photo shows Trudeau at a school talent show wearing a wig.

Recently, there was a video showing Trudeau in blackface with his hands in the air and the photo was taken in the early 90s.

This is a big problem for him because he recently began his re-election and the citizens may not want to re-elect him because of his scandals. 

Trudeau was gaining media attention from the global press for what he was wearing. Last year, he wore Indian garb when he went to India with his family.

He was also denounced by Robert Davidson, who is a part of the indigenous people, because of a tattoo. Davidson said that Trudeau’s government’s approval of a gas facility showed that he was not sensitive towards the indigenous people.

TIME spoke to different people who attended the spring gala in 2001, especially the women in the photos with him. One of them refused to speak about the situation and the other two forgot about Trudeau and the picture.

Trudeau was the only person who darkened his skin while everyone else had costumes.

Trudeau is not the only public figure who darkened his skin for a costume. The U.S. has a bad history of people darkening their skin. People would just darken their skin to mock African Americans in the 19th century and it continued on into the 20th century for movies and shows.

The first person to apologize for this cruel action was Governor Ralph Northam, but he denied that he was in a yearbook photo with a KKK hood.

Also, Governor Kay Ivey apologized for wearing a black face. 

Volunteering at the Minnesota Children’s Museum

 


The Minnesota Children’s Museum (MCM) is all about learning through the act of play. As a Play Team volunteer at the MCM, one must interact with children and find their inner playful side. 

In order to be a MCM Play Team volunteer, one must be in 9th – 12th grade. 

MCM Play Team volunteers must volunteer for, usually, a four hour shift. Shifts are available from:

Friday, 5pm-8pm

Saturday, 8:45am-12:45pm

Saturday, 12pm-4:30pm

Saturday, 3:45pm-8pm

Sunday, 8:45am-12:45pm

Sunday, 12pm-4:30pm

These are the shifts that are available during the school year. Each volunteer must complete a minimum of 10 shifts before the end of the school year. These 10 shifts may be scattered throughout the school year, but one of the 10 shifts must be on a “Target Free Sunday.” 

“Target Free Sunday” occurs once a month and it is when the museum allows visitors to go in for free. Typically, these days get very busy and one’s normal responsibilities change, along with the schedule.

A regular schedule at the museum starts off with “Daily Development” which is supposed to warm you up for the museum floor. At “Daily Development,” volunteers get to interact with other volunteers and play games, as well as finding the deeper meaning to those games. 

After “Daily Development,” everyone gets their schedules and are ready to go onto the floor. 

Schedules consist of around 6 different shifts, and each shift lasts 30 minutes. During a shift you go to an area in the museum and interact with children to help them learn through play. 

Around 15 minutes before the end, all the volunteers head to the volunteer area and end with “Reflection.” “Reflection” is very similar to “Daily Development,” but it’s at the end instead of the beginning. At “Reflection,” volunteers reflect on how their day was and how they could better improve as volunteers. 

Being a volunteer at the MCM allows you to play, learn, and teach alongside other teens and children. 

If you would like to become a volunteer at the Minnesota Children’s Museum email: 

volunteers@mcm.org